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Tag Archives: Holy Spirit

God Breathed Life Into Man

"And the LORD God formed man of the dust of the ground, and breathed into his nostrils the breath of life; and man became a living soul." (Genesis 2:7)

“Then the LORD God formed man of dust from the ground, and breathed into his nostrils the breath of life; and man became a living being” (Genesis 2:7)

Human beings were created differently than any other of God’s creatures. God commanded the earth and the waters to bring forth every plant and animal, every fish and bird. But when it came time to create man, God “formed” him.

As a potter fashions clay into the shape he desires, the Lord took the dust and clay of the Earth and formed man into what He desired. Then He breathed life into his nostrils. This “breath” was the spirit of man, complete with its own will, its intellect and reason, and its capacity for morality and fellowship with his Creator. All of the things that separate man from the animals. Man was made a living soul.

With a body that was created from and tethered to this Earth, and a spirit that was breathed into him by the God of Heaven, so would the foundation be laid that would eventually become man’s struggle between that which is of the flesh and that which is of the Spirit. This dichotomy within the very nature of man would serve as the type and metaphor for the struggle within every believer as he is drawn toward the things of God in his spirit, yet pulled toward the things of Earth within his flesh.

The human body, as intricate and wonderfully made as it is, is not what defines a person. It is this spirit which God breathes into him. It is this spirit which bears the image and likeness of God. It is this spirit which died the day that Adam and Eve ate of the fruit of the forbidden tree, and it is this spirit which must be “born again” if we are to ever live in the presence of God. Since the Fall of man in the Garden of Eden, people would be born with a corrupted spirit. People are not born as a “living soul”, but as a “lifeless spirit.”

When we make Jesus Christ our Lord and Savior, He breathes a spirit into us that is full of life. It is an incorruptible spirit that comes from the Holy Spirit and bears the image of God. We move from spiritual death to Spiritual life and are made a new creation in Jesus Christ. When we die, our bodies return to the dust of the Earth from which they came, but our spirits return to our Heavenly Father who breathed them into us when we placed our faith in His Son.

To Jesus Christ goes all glory. In service to Him,

Loren

loren@answersfromthebook.org

[This post was originally published August 6, 2009]

**Unless otherwise indicated, all Scripture quotations are taken from the New American Standard Bible (NASB) © The Lockman Foundation and are used by permission.

[If you do not know the Lord Jesus Christ or you are not certain where you are headed when this life ends, I invite you to read the article “Am I Going To Heaven?“]

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Light Is Separated From Darkness

"And God saw the light, that it was good: and God divided the light from the darkness." (Genesis 1:4)

“God saw that the light was good; and God separated the light from the darkness” (Genesis 1:4)

On the very first day of Creation, God separated light from darkness. In doing so, He set into motion the cycle of day and night that would mark the passage of time on planet Earth. Genesis 1:5 tells us that the first evening and morning were the first day.

But in separating the darkness from the light, God also forever divided that which speaks of His glory from that which speaks of His absence. Throughout the Bible, light will serve as a metaphor for the presence and glory of Almighty God while darkness will symbolize any place where He is not. God truly is omnipresent, eternally existing in all places at all times, but His manifest glory does not illuminate every dark place, particularly the darkness that people hide themselves in from His presence. God will provide the Light of His glory to anyone who will receive it, but He will force no one to walk in His Light.

In Heaven, at God’s throne, those whose names are written in the Lamb’s Book of Life shall dwell forever in the very Light that is Jesus Christ (Revelation 21:23). There will be no night there (Revelation 21:25, 22:5) nor so much as a shadow. Pure Light will shine forever, never to be extinguished. In Hell, the place of eternal banishment from the presence of God, no light shall ever enter in. Jesus described it as “outer darkness” (Matthew 8:12, 22:13, 25:30). In Hell, there will be nothing but total darkness.

It is here on Earth during this lifetime that we have the presence of darkness AND the presence of Light. The one that we choose to walk in now determines the one that we will dwell in for eternity. Let us choose to walk in the Light.

To Jesus Christ goes all glory. In service to Him,

Loren

loren@answersfromthebook.org

[This post was originally published July 12, 2009]

**Unless otherwise indicated, all Scripture quotations are taken from the New American Standard Bible (NASB) © The Lockman Foundation and are used by permission.

[If you do not know the Lord Jesus Christ or you are not certain where you are headed when this life ends, I invite you to read the article “Am I Going To Heaven?“]

Light Comes Into A Dark World

"And God said, Let there be light: and there was light." (Genesis 1:3)

“Then God said, “Let there be light”; and there was light.” (Genesis 1:3)

The very first act that the Spirit of God does when He moves upon the dark and chaotic earth is to let the light come upon it. God does not create light here to shine on the earth, rather He allows the light that is already there to reach it. This is not the Sun on the very first day of Creation, the Sun is not created until day 4. God will later set the Sun, Moon, and stars in the heavens to give light to the earth.

This first “light” on day 1 is a light that comes directly from God Himself. God is the “Father of lights” (James 1:17) Who dwells in an unapproachable Light (1 Timothy 6:16). “Light” is a symbol of the very glory of God. It is only by the Light of God that a person can truly see, lest they be doomed to darkness.

God did not need to “turn the lights on” on that very first day so that He could see what He was doing. He gave the Light for our sakes. Men commit sinful deeds by the cover of darkness and in the shadows, but when God moves, He does it in the open light.

The true Light of the world is Jesus Christ (John 8:12) Whom the Father sent so that none of us should remain in darkness. He is to be the Light of our lives. God’s first act when He moved upon this dark world was to bring light into it, He does the same thing today when He moves upon our dark lives.

To Jesus Christ goes all glory. In service to Him,

Loren

loren@answersfromthebook.org

[This post was originally published July 10, 2009]

**Unless otherwise indicated, all Scripture quotations are taken from the New American Standard Bible (NASB) © The Lockman Foundation and are used by permission.

[If you do not know the Lord Jesus Christ or you are not certain where you are headed when this life ends, I invite you to read the article “Am I Going To Heaven?“]

What Happens When The Spirit Of God Moves

"And the earth was without form, and void; and darkness was upon the face of the deep. And the Spirit of God moved upon the face of the waters." (Genesis 1:2)

“And the earth was without form, and void; and darkness was upon the face of the deep. And the Spirit of God moved upon the face of the waters.” (Genesis 1:2 KJV)

Without form. Void. Darkness. God had created the earth, but He sure wasn’t done with it yet. Here we have the earth as an empty canvas, waiting for the Spirit of God to begin “applying the paint” to it.

The words that are used to describe our planet in its initial stage are quite interesting. It was “without form”, it was “void.” It was “dark.” These terms conjure up the image of an uninhabitable chaos, a world that lacked order. The description in the original Hebrew is so dark and vivid that some have interpreted this to mean that the world must have been judged and abandoned by God sometime between Genesis 1:1 and Genesis 1:2.

But isn’t this really just an appropriate description of anything before God moves upon it? The Spirit of God moved upon the face of the waters and brought order out of chaos. The dark, formless, void we see in verse 2 will be declared “good” in verse 31. What a beautiful picture of what happens when God gets a hold of something!

What about your life? Is your life void and without form, filled with darkness, or has the Spirit of God moved upon you?

To Jesus Christ goes all glory. In service to Him,

Loren

loren@answersfromthebook.org

[This post was originally published July 8, 2009]

**Unless otherwise indicated, all Scripture quotations are taken from the New American Standard Bible (NASB) © The Lockman Foundation and are used by permission.

[If you do not know the Lord Jesus Christ or you are not certain where you are headed when this life ends, I invite you to read the article “Am I Going To Heaven?“]

The Manna Ceased (Joshua 5:12)

“The manna ceased on the day after they had eaten some of the produce of the land, so that the sons of Israel no longer had manna, but they ate some of the yield of the land of Canaan during that year.” (Joshua 5:12)

The daily appearance of the Manna in the Wilderness was nothing short of miraculous. The Manna itself is a reminder that, regardless of whither our Lord shall lead us, He will provide for all our needs when we faithfully walk in His will. Even if He must employ inexplicable and miraculous means, God will never leave us without. The Lord is our Shepherd, we shall know no want.

Even so, this passage in the Book of Joshua reveals that God, though capable of operating in His Universe without any limitations on behalf of those who are His own, seems to prefer the ordinary, the mundane, and the visible over the extraordinary and sublime. Within the pages of Scripture we find no instances of a miracle of God performed without distinct purpose and seldom is a miracle implemented when other, more conventional methods are readily available. Our Lord is a wonder-working God possessing unfathomable supernatural abilities, yet He does not frivolously execute miracles for the entertainment and amusement of His creation. Neither will God endlessly bolster a superficial and tenuous faith with a ceaseless cavalcade of astonishing acts of Divine power. Our faith is to rest on the Person of Christ and what He has done for our Salvation, not upon His ability to impress us with His wonders.

God poured out the Manna from Heaven because no other sufficient source of food was available in the barren Wilderness through which the Children of Israel passed into Canaan. If grain had been plenteous in that land, we may be certain that God would have directed His people to partake of it. But it was not. Thus the Manna began to appear daily in the camp and continued to do so as long as it was necessary. The time came, however, when the Hebrews entered into the Land of Promise and ate of the yield of Canaan.

In our own walk with the Lord, our flesh continues to crave the sensational, the spectacular; our fascination with the strange and wonderful seeks to be gratified. But it is not the miraculous and supernatural which needs to be emphasized in the Body of Christ today, it is the preaching and study of His Word. Many believers are contented to keep their eyes fixed on the sky, waiting for the Manna to fall in their midst when all the while the Lord is wanting them to eat the “natural food” to which they already have access. God cares too much for our spiritual growth to forever spoon-feed us that which satiates our curiosity yet leaves our souls growling with hunger.

To eat the yield of the land, that is, to come before the Lord in an attitude of prayerful expectation as we open our Bibles even as He opens the eyes of our understanding requires effort and work on our part. But that is the way that God intends for it to be. Remember, the generation that first partook of the Manna was that same generation which perished in the Wilderness. Apparently the supernatural provision of daily food was not enough to subdue hearts bent on rebellion.

Finally, let us consider that the cessation of the Manna in no way meant that God was no longer working tirelessly on behalf of the Hebrews. For in the very next verse of Joshua we have the revelation of the pre-incarnate Lord Jesus as the Captain of the Hosts of the Lord. Neither was the end of Manna the end of God’s miraculous intervention for the Israelites because the conquest of Jericho is related in the following chapter. God’s powerful, wonder-working hand is always laboring for the welfare, safety, and provision of His people, either visibly or invisibly. We do not see the Captain of the Hosts of the Lord marching with the Hebrews around Jericho, but surely He was there among them. It was He Who would cause the walls of the city to collapse.

When the Holy Spirit speaks through His Word to a heart desperately seeking answers and to know Him better, is this any less of a “miracle” than a physical sickness being healed? When the Word of God brings light to a heart plagued by darkness, is this less of a work of the Lord than speaking in an unknown tongue? And when the Lord Jesus Christ turns on the light of understanding in a person who has rejected Him time and time again, the Gospel penetrating a lost soul through the preaching of Scripture and bringing the life of Salvation where before only death reigned, is this less significant than even an actual bodily resurrection would be?

To God goes all glory. In service to Him,

Loren

loren@answersfromthebook.org

**Unless otherwise indicated, all Scripture quotations are taken from the New American Standard Bible  (NASB) © The Lockman Foundation and are used by permission.

[If you do not know the Lord Jesus Christ or you are not certain where you are headed when this life ends, I invite you to read the article “Am I Going To Heaven?”]

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